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Typographic solution for functional areas

Next to the functional layer of the orientation system I created a philosophical layer. Several selected quotes will be installed within the building to reflect the changing paradigm of the public library.

 

When visitors enter the building, the first quote they notice is a section from the second article of the German constitution: “Everyone has the right for free development of their personality.”

Access to knowledge is a mean to how one can develop his or her personality.

Entrance area on the ground floor

Entrance area on the ground floor

 

When using the self-service to return a book, a sound poem arranged in arrow formation indicates the direction users should swipe their books across the scanner.

Self-service - book returns

Self-service – book returns

 

The fifth article of the German constitution decorates the area surrounding computers with access to the internet.

“Everyone has the right to inform themselves through publicly accessible sources.”

Computer area

Computer area

 

Ernst Jandl’s sound poem “Wanderung” (preregrination) decorates the staircases leading to the third floor, which holds arts, humanities, and philosophy.

The poem’s title is on the floor of the landing. It reads from top to bottom, and by the last step, the poem is finished and can be read backwards.

Stairs to third floor with arts, language, and humanities

Stairs to second floor with literature, poems, and novels

 

Initial questions of visitors are typically more generic. Visitors’s initial questions are typically generic. The information desk on the first floor holds the first part of Ernst Jandl’s sound poem about searching.

The second half of the poem deals with knowing something, but still searching for it. This second part is installed on the information desk on the second floor that holds the sciences.

Information desk on first floor

Information desk on first floor

 

Another Ernst Jandl sound poem is installed in some of the reading corners, where visitors find the time to read.

Reading area

Reading area

 

The second part of Ernst Jandl’s sound poem (which started at the information desk on the first floor) is continued on the second floor. The second half deals with knowing something, but not knowing where it is.

Information desk on second floor

Information desk on second floor

 

Ernst Jandl’s sound poem on the multitude of quiet people is installed on the floor. The poem starts in the center initially in large letters, that get smaller the farther away the visitor walks towards the work stations located near the outside of the building.

The workstations are considered quiet zones where visitors can concentrate, for which the poem’s interpretation is aptly suited.

Silent and reading zones

Silent and reading zones

 

Another installment for designated reading zones and the cafe on the fifth floor inspires visitors to let “their thoughts run free”.

Library cafe

Library cafe